Steps to Balance

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  • Home
  • Learn about treatment options
  • Manage My Blood Sugar

  • Why It’s Important
  • Knowing the Ups and Downs
  • Measuring Your Blood Sugar
  • Watching my highs and lows
  • Staying on Top of the Facts
  • Understanding Medication
  • Downloading Resources
  • Lose Weight

  • Why It’s Important
  • Tipping the Scale in Your Favor
  • Controlling Portions
    • Right–Size It
    • The Plate Method
  • Staying on Track
  • Shopping Smarter
    • Food for Thought
    • Behind the Claims
    • Nutrition Labels
  • Eating Healthy Recipes
  • Doing the Math
    • Body Mass Index
    • Target Heart Rate
  • Planning for Occasions
  • Downloading Resources
  • Be Active

  • Why It’s Important
  • Doing It My Way
  • Let’s Get Moving
  • Sticking With It
  • Doing the Math
    • Body Mass Index
    • Target Heart Rate
  • Upping My Activity
  • Staying Active All Year
  • Downloading Resources
  • Stress Less

  • Why It’s Important
  • Learning To Relax
  • Finding Support
  • Solving Problems
Steps to Balance  
 

Actor portrayal. blood sugar level test

Why It’s
Important

Blood sugar is your body’s main source of energy. Your doctor probably told you that you have type 2 diabetes because you had too much sugar in your blood. Fortunately, there are ways to help keep your blood sugar levels under control.

Want to know what makes blood sugar levels rise and fall? Need more information about the tests that measure your blood sugar levels? You’ve come to the right place.

Knowing
the Ups
and Downs

Do you know what causes blood sugar levels to rise and fall when you have type 2 diabetes? Do you want to learn what may help keep your levels under control? Here’s a little background.

 high and low blood sugar levels

High blood sugar levels.

Insulin is a hormone that your pancreas makes. It helps sugar move out of the bloodstream and into many cells of the body, where it’s used for energy. When you have type 2 diabetes, your body does not make enough insulin, and the insulin that your body produces does not work as well as it should. Both of these situations may lead to too much sugar in your blood.

Help get back on track with the right treatment plan.

Blood sugar levels may be controlled with the help of medicine and lifestyle changes. Talk to your doctor. By working together, you can come up with a plan to help you control your blood sugar.

  • Measuring
    Blood Sugar

    Why is it important to measure your blood sugar levels every day with a glucose meter? What do the results of your A1C test mean? What numbers should you aim for? Here are some
    answers.

     daily blood sugar testing

    Learn about daily self-testing and the A1C test.

    The results of your daily self-tests with a glucose meter and the A1C test are important. They may help you and your doctor understand how well your type 2 diabetes treatment plan is working.

    Find out more about each test now. And to help make it easier to track
    your numbers, download a Daily Glucose Tracker.

  • Measuring
    Blood Sugar

    Why is it important to measure your blood sugar levels every day with a glucose meter? What do the results of your A1C test mean? What numbers should you aim for? Here are
    some answers.

     blood sugar goal levels

    Self-testing shows your daily progress.

    This is a blood test you perform daily with a glucose meter. It tells you what your blood sugar level is at that point in time. Self-testing may help you learn which foods and activities have an impact on your blood sugar levels. It also helps you understand if your treatment plan is working.

    Know what to aim for.

    Your doctor will set blood sugar goal levels that are right for you. Once your doctor has set your goals, it’s important to stay at or near that number.

  • Measuring
    Blood Sugar

    Why is it important to measure your blood sugar levels every day with a glucose meter? What do the results of your A1C test mean? What numbers should you aim for? Here are
    some answers.

     big picture with A1C test

    The A1C test gives you the big picture.

    It measures the average amount of sugar in your blood over the past 2 to 3
    months. It gives you and your doctor a better idea of how well your treatment
    plan has been working over time. And whether your blood sugar levels are under
    control.

    Know what to aim for.

    Ask your doctor what is the right goal for you. Until you reach your goal, you’ll
    likely take an A1C test every 3 months. If you’ve already reached your goal, then your doctor may check your A1C every 6 months.

  • Watching Highs
    and Lows

    What does it mean to have
    high or low blood sugar levels? And how do you control your levels so they stay within a target range? Get the scoop on blood sugar highs and lows here.

    High blood sugar.

    What is it?

    High blood sugar is also called hyperglycemia. It may occur for many reasons when you have type 2 diabetes. Your body may have enough insulin, but it is not as effective as it should be. Or your body may not have enough insulin. It also may occur when you eat too much. Are less active than usual. Are sick or under stress. Or need a change in diabetes medicine.

    Are there symptoms?

    Some common symptoms of high blood sugar include feeling thirsty. Having to urinate more often. Feeling hungry even when you’ve eaten. Losing weight. And blurred vision. However, high blood sugar may not cause symptoms, or may be so mild that they are unnoticed.

    Should it be treated?

    Yes. A high blood sugar level may be serious if you do not treat it. You will know if your blood sugar level is too high, if you have symptoms, by checking your blood sugar with a glucose meter and/or by getting your A1C test as recommended by your doctor. Ask your doctor if you need changes in diet, activity, or your diabetes medicine to help better control your blood sugar level.

     high blood sugar level
  • Watching Highs
    and Lows

    What does it mean to have
    high or low blood sugar levels? And how do you control your levels so they stay within a target range? Get the scoop on blood sugar highs and lows here.

    Low blood sugar.

    What is it?

    Low blood sugar is also called hypoglycemia. There are many different causes. It may happen even when you’re doing all you can to manage your type 2 diabetes. Or it may happen when you don’t eat enough. Delay a meal or snack. Exercise too much. Or take certain medicines.

    Are there symptoms?

    There may be. You may feel dizzy, sweaty, or shaky. But the only way to be sure is to check your blood sugar level. That’s why self-testing is so important.

    Should it be treated?

    Yes. Untreated hypoglycemia may quickly get worse and you could pass out. Work with your doctor to create a plan that may help control your blood sugar.

    Also, be sure to talk with your doctor about what you should do if your blood sugar goes too low and when to seek medical attention.

     low blood sugar level

Staying
on Top of
the Facts

Looking for more information on how blood sugar affects your body? Want to understand more about blood sugar levels and type 2 diabetes? We’ve got a few facts that may be interesting.

  blood sugar facts
 
 
 
 
 

Take a closer look at what you need to know.

The relationship between your body and your blood sugar levels is worth learning about. And the more you know, the more you’ll understand how controlling your blood sugar levels may help. So let’s start with 5 basic facts.

  • Resources

    Need a little more support?
    Wish it were a little easier to
    track your blood sugar results? Check out this useful resource you can download.

     

    Keep track of your results.

    Want a simple way to track your daily numbers? Download this helpful tool.
    Use it to track your blood sugar results and see how close you’re staying to your target goal.


 

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